Archive for Symptoms

Feel Better With Fall Allergies

Twitter @LifeAllergyFree

By Atul N. Shah, MD, FACAAI, FAAAAI,
Medical Director, Center4AsthmaAllergy.com;
Founder, AmazingAllergist.com;
Bestselling Author of “Allergies, and Awesome You

The Fall Allergy Season is in full swing. For those with fall allergy, this is the time with runny nose, sneezing, congestion, post nasal drip, cough, itchy eyes, watery eyes and many more allergy symptoms. The usual triggers are ragweed, some weeds and mold. Fall allergy symptoms can be prevented and minimized with certain steps. If you have seasonal symptoms every year, you can get tested to identify the triggers. Limiting outdoor activities when the pollen is very high and staying indoors with air conditioning can reduce exposure to ragweed and weed pollen and other triggers. Keeping the bed room windows closed and car windows rolled up while driving can be helpful. You may consider taking a shower, washing the hair and changing the clothes after pollen exposure outdoors. There are many prescription and non-prescription alternatives available to start before the pollen season. Allergy Vaccination or allergy immunotherapy is a great treatment option for a long term relief.

AmazingAllergist's Five Steps to Awesome Life, allergy-free.
 
1. Recognize the allergy symptoms – runny nose, sneezing, itchy nose, stuffy nose, post nasal drip, scratchy throat, itchy palate, itchy watery eyes, red eyes and ask for help.
2. Get tested- identify the allergy triggers. This can be done through needle free allergy skin tests or through the blood tests.
3. Avoid these triggers to the extent possible.
4. Use supportive methods and medications to alleviate the symptoms
5. Get started on Allergen immunotherapy or allergy vaccination (this helps you develop tolerance to your allergy triggers) 

Those with fall allergies, especially children, can at times be very symptomatic. These symptoms affect the sleep, day time alertness and day to day functioning. The quality of life is very much compromised and allergic individuals do not enjoy outdoor life while everyone around them is having outdoor fun. Help your children understand what allergies are and what they can do to live great lives, allergy-free. The www.AmazingAllergist.com has a lot of resources, including the stories of others who got better, to empower your allergic children. The information and education are the usual starting points to a future of an allergy free season. The support of family and friends is very valuable at any stage of being miserable with allergies.

About the Author:
Atul N. Shah, MD, FACAAI, FAAAAI, is a board certified allergist and the bestselling author of the children’s book, Allergies, and Awesome You. He is also a medical director of www.Center4AsthmaAllergy.com and the founder of the educational website www.AmazingAllergist.com. He has earned an honor of fellowships in both the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. He has personally treated more than 20,000 patients, made a significant impact on more than 100,000 lives as an allergist and earned the nickname “AmazingAllergist” from his patients and peers. He has been recognized with various awards, including the America’s Top Physicians’ Award, the Patients’ Choice Award, and the Most Compassionate Physicians’ Award. He believes that every allergic child and individual has a potential to live a great life, allergy-free.

As a reader of this article, receive a FREE copy of Dr. Shah’s eBook– ALLERGY. You Asked, We Answered .
(FREE download at www.Center4AsthmaAllergy.com and www.AmazingAllergist.com)

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Increasing Allergies among Infants

Infants with Allergies: prevention and management

By Atul N. Shah, MD, FACAAI, FAAAAI,
Medical Director, Center4AsthmaAllergy.com;
Founder, AmazingAllergist.com;
Bestselling Author of “Allergies, and Awesome You

By Dr. Atul Shah, the ‘AmazingAllergist’ and author of Allergies, and Awesome You!
I was recently giving a presentation for a group of pediatricians and heard the common theme that many of them are seeing more and more infants with eczema, food allergies and other allergic conditions. This is a common observation, not only in the U.S., but all across the globe. There are many theories, including the hygiene hypothesis, but we do not know for sure the underlying cause of this influx.
It is a common misconception among many, including some physicians, that infants do not develop allergies or cannot be tested for allergies until two years of age. Our clinical experience and current medical literature supports early detection and proper management of infants and young children to minimize their suffering and prevent complications related to delayed diagnosis.
The development of allergies in infants is considered multifactorial, meaning there are other factors playing a role besides genetic predisposition. If parents, family members or siblings have allergies, infants have a higher chance of developing allergies. Other factors that influence immune systems include breast feeding, the type of formula, timing of introducing solids, respiratory infection, exposure to pets, secondhand smoke exposure, urban vs. rural living and gut bacterial flora. The relationship of these factors in developing allergies vs. protecting from allergies is very complex and we still do not have clear answers.
The common symptoms of underlying allergies in infants include eczema, rash, allergic reactions, poor weight gain, reflux, colic, vomiting, bloating, diarrhea, cough, nasal and respiratory symptoms, frequent ear infections, etc. Food allergies can cause life-threatening allergic reactions.
As we now know, restricting a mother’s diet during pregnancy and while breast-feeding has not been proven to be effective in preventing allergies. Restricting a mother’s diet can be beneficial only if the infant’s specific food allergies are confirmed. Breast milk is least likely to trigger an allergic reaction, and it strengthens an infant’s immune system. Most experts agree on exclusive breast-feeding for the first four to six months.
After four to six months of age, introduce one food at a time, starting with fruits, vegetables and cereal grains. This allows parents a chance to identify and avoid any food that causes an allergic reaction. Delaying introduction of solids beyond six months of age has not been proven to be beneficial in preventing food allergies.
Avoiding secondhand tobacco smoke exposure and reducing dust mites in the infant’s environment has been linked to reduced wheezing and respiratory symptoms.
The relationship between early life exposure to pets, such as dogs and cats, and the development of allergies and asthma is not clear. It was once believed that infants exposed to animals early in life were more likely to develop allergies and asthma. Recently conducted research and published data shows that early exposure to dogs, cats and farm animals may actually protect children from developing allergies and asthma.
What can you do?
1. Recognize the symptoms of allergies. Keep a diary of your infant’s progress and discuss with your physician
2. Find out the underlying triggers of your infant’s allergies with an allergy skin test and /or blood tests
3. Avoid the identified allergic triggers, whether the trigger is in food or in the environment
4. Control allergy symptoms with recommended treatment from a physician, and monitor the nutrition, growth and overall development of your child
5. Keep learning more about allergies and available options. New research findings happen all the time, and being on the forefront of information can only benefit you and your family.

About the Author:
Atul N. Shah, MD, FACAAI, FAAAAI, is a board certified allergist and the bestselling author of the children’s book, Allergies, and Awesome You. He is also a medical director of www.Center4AsthmaAllergy.com and the founder of the educational website www.AmazingAllergist.com. He has earned an honor of fellowships in both the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. He has personally treated more than 20,000 patients, made a significant impact on more than 100,000 lives as an allergist and earned the nickname “AmazingAllergist” from his patients and peers. He has been recognized with various awards, including the America’s Top Physicians’ Award, the Patients’ Choice Award, and the Most Compassionate Physicians’ Award. He believes that every allergic child and individual has a potential to live a great life, allergy-free.

As a reader of this article, receive a FREE copy of Dr. Shah’s eBook– ALLERGY. You Asked, We Answered .
(FREE download at www.Center4AsthmaAllergy.com and www.AmazingAllergist.com)

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Relief from Seasonal Allergies

Relief from Seasonal Allergies

Seasonal allergy symptoms can be prevented and minimized with certain steps. If you have seasonal symptoms every year, you can get tested to identify the triggers. Depending on where you live and the time of the year when you have symptoms, your triggers can be tree pollen, grass pollen, weeds, ragweed or mold spores. Limiting outdoor activities when the pollen is very high and staying indoors with air conditioning can reduce exposure to pollen and other triggers. Keeping the bed room windows closed and car windows rolled up while driving can be helpful. You may consider taking a shower, washing the hair and changing the clothes after pollen exposure outdoors. There are many prescription and non-prescription alternatives available to start before the pollen season. Allergy Vaccination or allergy immunotherapy is a great treatment option for a long term relief.

AmazingAllergist's Five Steps to Awesome Life, allergy-free.
 
1. Recognize the allergy symptoms – runny nose, sneezing, itchy nose, stuffy nose, post nasal drip, scratchy throat, itchy palate, itchy watery eyes, red eyes and ask for help.
2. Get tested- identify the allergy triggers. This can be done through needle free allergy skin tests or through the blood tests.
3. Avoid these triggers to the extent possible.
4. Use supportive methods and medications to alleviate the symptoms
5. Get started on Allergen immunotherapy or allergy vaccination (this helps you develop tolerance to your allergy triggers) 
Those with seasonal allergies, especially children, can at times be very symptomatic. These symptoms affect the sleep, day time alertness and day to day functioning. The quality of life is very much compromised and allergic individuals do not enjoy outdoor life while everyone around them is having outdoor fun. Help your children understand what allergies are and what they can do to live great lives, allergy-free. The www.AmazingAllergist.com has a lot of resources, including the stories of others who got better, to empower your allergic children. The information and education are the usual starting points to a future of an allergy free season. The support of family and friends is very valuable at any stage of being miserable with allergies.

Allergy Symptoms

Allergy Symptoms

 
If you or someone you love has allergies, there is help available. The truth is you can live a great life allergy free. The AmazingAllergist and his team can help get you there. The first step to regaining your quality of life is to recognize that you have allergies. Here we’ll explain what an allergy is, how to recognize the symptoms and how to get help.
 
When your body’s immune mechanism overreacts to something that is harmless in your environment, it’s called an allergy. For example, when a person without allergies to tree pollen breathes in pollen, they feel fine. If an allergic person inhales tree pollen, his or her body overreacts to the pollen and causes an allergic reaction which could be sneezing, watery eyes, a runny nose and so on. 
 
It can be difficult in the first few days of a runny nose to know whether it’s from a cold or allergies. Here are some tips to help you differentiate between a cold and allergies and take appropriate steps for treatment.
 
Look for the associated symptoms in either condition. The symptoms of a common cold include runny nose, mild or low grade fever, body aches or feeling tired, occasional sneezing, a sore throat, mild cough, even a headache and sometimes stomach upset or diarrhea. These symptoms are caused by a variety of viruses and usually subside within seven to 10 days.
The symptoms associated with allergies include runny nose, violent and prolonged spells of sneezing, stuffy and/or itchy nose, itchy eyes, ears and throat, and symptoms of other allergic conditions like asthma, eczema or sinusitis. Sometimes allergies may even be associated with a scratchy throat, fatigue or a headache. The main differentiating feature is the presence of a mild fever in the common cold and the absence of it in allergy-related conditions.
The duration of the symptoms can also be helpful. Cold symptoms usually lessen in seven to 10 days, while allergy symptoms can last for weeks or months. Allergy symptoms can be seasonal or year round. Seasonal allergies from grass or tree pollen, ragweed or other weeds can trigger symptoms in specific seasons (spring, summer or fall). A year round allergy is most likely related to indoor allergens like dust, dust-mites, feathers, mold, cockroaches, or pets.
The treatment of a runny nose from allergies includes many other things besides allergy pills and prescription nose spray. Allergy skin tests or blood tests help determine the source of the allergy. Avoiding the cause can help significantly. In severe conditions, allergy vaccinations with shots or drops can be very useful and help prevent the recurrence of allergy-related symptoms. Vaccinations improve asthma, nasal, eye and sinus conditions and help reduce the amount of medications needed to control allergy symptoms.
So, once you realize that you have allergies, the next step, and a very important one is to believe that you can live a great life despite the allergies. It’s been a reality for many people who have believed and followed the advice of the AmazingAllergist and his team. If you agree that you’ll get better, you’ll be open to learning, discovering and using resources that can help you get there. Professionals are there to guide you, but only you can take the necessary actions to better your health and quality of life.